Fresh February Finds: A Guide to Staying Warm and in Uniform this Winter

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PICTURED ABOVE: 01. Juniors Isabel Peppard and Maddie McBride prepare to start a new creation. 02. Junior Regan Halverson sports a Hockaday thermos. 03. Courtney Katz, junior, stores tea in her Corkcicle. 04. Layering up to keep warm, junior Felicity Diamond wears multiple pairs of socks


On Feb. 2, 2018, a small groundhog emerged from his burrow in western Pennsylvania and saw his shadow. Just like that, the American public was quick to declare another six weeks of winter.

Although our logic for determining the length of winter apparently relies on whether or not an inane, scrawny rodent can see his shadow, it’s still cold and raining in Texas, so perhaps there is some credibility in this celebrated tradition.

So, “Why should I keep reading this article?” you’re wondering? Well, whether you realize it or not, one of the largest, most pressing issues in the Hockaday community revolves solely around dress codes. Staying warm during these last, cold weeks of winter and being in uniform can often be a very fine line to walk. I think we can all relate to feeling that one gets from venturing down a bustling hall during a passing period while wearing a club sweatshirt when it’s not a Friday. Sheer terror.

However, not to worry! Your thoughts no longer need to be haunted by seemingly impossible ways in which you can simultaneously stay warm and be uniform. Take a gander at this article to learn how to accomplish both.

Take up Knitting

Although it can seem intimidating to those who possess little artistic skill and/or motor-control, knitting is an activity that is fairly easy to learn. Not only that, but it is a hobby that can be picked up at almost any time in one’s life. Better yet, completing this activity bears a tangible reward. According to an article published in The New York Times, knitting has a “calming effect” and helps “enhance social skills.” The hobby has even helped some cope with health-related issues, such as cancer diagnosis.

Junior Maddie McBride enjoys knitting in her downtime.

“Knitting is like riding a bike, once you learn how to do it, you never forget it,” McBride said. “I really like it not only because it is super relaxing but because you can make comfy things for yourself during the winter, too.”

Teach yourself to knit if you have some spare time. What better way to stay warm and take a mental break than to create a cozy scarf or blanket that you can wear on the three-mile walk from overflow parking to class?

Brew a Beverage

Not one for taking up new hobbies? Try brewing a warm drink instead. Often times, a piping hot glass of tea, coffee or hot chocolate is all it takes to help circulate the blood flow throughout the body. However, in order to properly sport this look, it is essential that you own a Yeti, Corkcicle, Himalayan or some other type of thermos which you can store your drink in. For maximum insulation ability, the thermos should preferably be brightly colored and monogrammed/engraved.

Lay on the Layers

Putting on layers under your uniform is yet another way to combat the cold. For instance, throw on a pair of plain, black leggings under your skirt to keep your legs warm. If you are feeling quite adventurous, try layering your socks as well. Our feet have the ability to help us keep a stable body temperature, so if they are cold, you are more likely to be cold as well.

Improve Your Mental Game

Believe it or not, a handful studies show that “coldness” is simply a state of mind. Some even claim that it is very possible to control one’s body temperature to a great extent by acting as if it is a warm, sunny day. Although I myself am not sure how plausible this theory is, researchers at the National University of Singapore found that some Westerners practice breathing techniques which are said to increase core temperature. One of these exercises consisted of visualizing flames at the bottom of the spine.

Create Ideas of Your Own

Although our selections for outerwear are limited by what the dress code allows, Bookstore Manager Dara Williams always welcomes recommendations on new products to carry.

“I’m always looking for suggestions. The True Grit style sweatshirts—that was someone coming in and saying, ‘Hey, can we carry something like that?’ I like to hear what’s popular and what’s fun,” Williams said.

Junior Felicity Diamond has taken this advice to heart. Although sweatpants are not part of the Hockaday dress code, Diamond hopes to propose a Hockaday-plaid sweatpant that could eventually be approved and sold at the bookstore.

“I know a lot of students currently wear sweatpants under their uniform, and although that is not in uniform, if we figured out a way to incorporate sweatpants into the uniform for certain days—or maybe just Fridays—I believe that more students would be less likely to break the ‘no sweatpants rule’ during regular days,” Diamond said.

So, if you have an idea that you believe is worthy of a spot on the shelves of the bookstore, try your luck. You never know, maybe it will be next year’s fad.


Photos and story by Charlotte Dross, Asst. A+L Editor

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Charlotte Dross

Charlotte is a junior and kiwi enthusiast. Her hobbies include petting her cat and drinking lemonade. She does not like tomatoes.

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