How to Prepare for a Snow Day

Prospective snow days are rare in Texas, and around the winter time, most students know better than to hope for one. Yet, on the evening of Jan. 15, students were elated to find out that there was heavy snowstorm blowing across east Texas. Unfortunately, Dallas ended up not being majorly affected by the storm and the schools reopened per usual. But here are some tips on how to prepare for a possible snow day.

Don’t do any of your homework.

As soon as you see the snow weather alert, drop your pencil and close your textbook. There’s no need to do homework if school is closed tomorrow, right?

Put on your comfiest pajamas, sit in bed and ignore the guilt of not doing your homework.

The comfort of being wrapped in your warmest blanket and wearing your coziest pajamas don’t exactly counteract the slight guilt you feel about not reading the 15-page chapter for AP U.S. History…but it’s better than actually reading the chapter.

Refresh the weather app every 30 seconds and pray for a text from school.

A 40 percent chance of precipitation at midnight followed by freezing temperatures equals ice, so you wouldn’t be able to drive to school anyway. Just to be extra sure, turn on your ringer so you can immediately know when school is canceled for sure.

Watch the clock as the hours pass, and wonder if Pete Delkus betrayed you yet again.

Suddenly it’s midnight, and crane your neck to look outside for the so-called rain. Then it’s 12:30 p.m., and the streets are still dry. The pile of textbooks and journals on your desk seems to be looming larger per minute. Begrudgingly, trudge to your desk and finish the history reading, check PowerSchool for all the homework you’ve neglected and cry a little for all that could have been.

Get into bed at 2:30 a.m.

Tomorrow is going to be a rough day. Minimal sleep, cold weather and an empty promise don’t mix well.


Story by Ponette Kim, Asst. News Editor

Photo Courtesy of Wikimedia

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Ponette Kim

Ponette is a lover of coffee, rowing, Italian landscapes and her dog, Honey. You can find her at Bachman Lake or at home in bed, reading. In five years, she hopes to be living in New York City.

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