The official student newspaper of The Hockaday School

The Fourcast

The official student newspaper of The Hockaday School

The Fourcast

The official student newspaper of The Hockaday School

The Fourcast

Ms. Day speaks to Hockaday students as well as other students in the Dallas area as part of her role to involve Hockaday students in the community and lead them to fulfill their purpose.
Jade
A day with Ms. Day
Sarah Moskowitz and Melinda HuMay 19, 2024

How did you get your start in social impact? Day: Out of college, I decided to do a year in a program called The Jesuit Volunteer Corps. It...

Lone Star Royalty Q&A
Jade
Lone Star Royalty Q&A
Lang Cooper and Mary Bradley SutherlandMay 17, 2024

What initially interested you in beauty pageants? Roberts: When I was six I joined the Miss America Organization. This program is for girls...

Opinion
Branching Out During Break
Jessica Boll, Web Editor in Chief • May 16, 2024

Instead of lazily lounging by the pool this summer, taking advantage of an academic break is the best usage of the months when we don't have...

Senior Splash Day
Senior Splash Day
May 13, 2024

Peter Kavinsky is No Longer Prince Charming: A Disappointed Review of “To All the Boys: P.S. I Still Love You”

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In August 2018, it seemed every teenage girl in the United States had fallen in love with Noah Centineo, or more specifically, Peter Kavinsky. That month, Netflix had released its original film “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before,” based on the book series of the same title.

Almost instantly, the movie became a smashing sensation and a romantic interpretation of young love that also featured complex characters. However, on Feb. 12, 2020, the series returned with its second movie in the trilogy and left me and other viewers dissatisfied.

The sequel “To All the Boys: P.S. I Still Love You” develops the relationship between the two main characters, Lara Jean Covey (Lana Condor) and Peter Kavinsky (Noah Centineo), after the first had chronicled their tumultuous fairytale relationship. The film also introduces a third main character and another recipient of Lara Jean’s letters, John Ambrose, played by the Disney Channel veteran Jordan Fisher.

The movie begins with Lara Jean and Peter’s very first “official” date as a couple. Just a few minutes in, the cringe-filled lines begin: “I’ve never been a girlfriend before” and “I hope I’m good at it.” Although this didn’t seem like a great start, I had high hopes for the rest of the movie after how much I liked the first one.

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Unfortunately, the film continues with awkward conversation between Lara Jean and Peter following awkward conversation. John Ambrose quickly became my only source of relief, his charming smile and easy jokes making up for the rest of the questionable plotline. 

Why, for example, does Peter spend so much time with his ex-girlfriend Gen without telling the girl he supposedly “loves?” Why does Lara Jean, a supposedly honest and honorable girl, hide her relationship with Peter from John Ambrose? Why does John Ambrose get left behind at the end, when he really is the saving grace of the film?

By the end of the movie, Peter has lost all his charm, instead becoming a jealous, secretive boyfriend most characters would quickly drop. His relationship with Lara Jean seems especially inconsistent and untrustworthy, and the only real emotion I’m feeling is pity for John Ambrose’s fate. (He deserved better!)

However, “To All the Boys: P.S. I Still Love You” is backed by a stellar soundtrack, led by the new, catchy hit “Moral of the Story” and supporting characters like the hilariously honest Kitty Covey, Lara Jean’s best friend Lucas and John Ambrose’s biggest fan and retirement home resident Stormy. 

With a third movie in the post-production stages, I can only hope that the “To All the Boys” trilogy will end as well as it began, even if the second movie failed to live up to my high expectations. 

Rating: 2/5 stars.


Story by Maddie Stout

Photo provided by Netflix/Bettina Strauss

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