“Stepping” into the Portal

//PICTURED ABOVE: Views editor Emily Wu, copy editor Ponette Kim and managing editor Paige Halveson


‘Tis the season, but Christmas presents are not the only surprises seniors will be getting during this time of the year. As early decision results are hitting the calendar, many people have already started picturing the moment of surprise. Should the moment be joined by a number of friends, or should it be enjoyed separately? The Fourcast writers take their stances.

Joy Sharers

by Paige Halverson

Forget the holidays—it’s college season, seniors, whether you like it or not. You’ve written the essays, sent in the scores and satisfied countless strangers’ college questions with “any state but Texas” or “east coast,” hundreds of times. Now, college decisions are coming. Appearing ominously either in your inbox or on your doorstep, the bombardment of acceptances or rejections will be arriving your way very soon, and there’s no hiding.

If you happen to get your hands on these letters before your meddlesome and apprehensive parents, you must determine when and where to open these life-changing envelopes. In your short life, these may as well be the most consequential, thrilling and painful seconds you will ever experience. So, the next question one must undoubtedly ask is: with whom do I share these moments with?

As for myself, I first surveyed the few secluded spots in my house where I can curl up, open a letter and continue either to cry or scream in peace, but after further investigation, the clear answer came to me. After spending my last four years with amazingly intelligent, compassionate and competitive girls at Hockaday, I want to share these special moments with people who have gone through the same thing as myself. Laughing, suffering and growing together throughout high school, I feel as though it is only natural to share these experiences that will determine my future with the people who have helped shape my present.

You could say I am slightly biased, having spent my last 18 years doing everything with my mirror-image hovering unwaveringly beside me, but having a twin has taught me that special moments usually tend to be shared with the ones you love the most.

From school to sports to taking out the trash, we’re conjoined at the hip. So, like many students, we’ve set a plan to open our letters with each other, whether it be in the car, at home or during Y period.

If that doesn’t float your college-boat, you can follow the example of our beloved graduated senior class of 2018. Try opening them in the school parking lot, your advisor’s classroom or the bathroom on the third floor of the science building–my personal favorite.

In such an encouraging but similarly competitive academic environment, sometimes seniors forget that one is not defined by the institution that awards your college degree. A rejection doesn’t indicate that life’s doors will now close indefinitely, as an acceptance also doesn’t determine your life’s success, effort or drive.

Knowing this, and ready to face either an acceptance or a rejection with a group of compassionate people by my side, I can conquer these letters with a celebratory entourage or a consoling shoulder to cry on.

So whether you choose to celebrate with a throng of your closest comrades or just your non-judgmental cat, remember that your worth and value in this world doesn’t change after you open your college decision letter. So no matter whatever comes in the mail around Dec. 15, the world awaits your contributions.

Privacy Lovers

by Emily Wu

Forget the holidays—it’s college season, seniors, whether you like it or not. You’ve written the essays, sent in the scores and satisfied countless strangers’ college questions with “any state but Texas” or “east coast,” hundreds of times. Now, college decisions are coming. Appearing ominously either in your inbox or on your doorstep, the bombardment of acceptances or rejections will be arriving your way very soon, and there’s no hiding.

If you happen to get your hands on these letters before your meddlesome and apprehensive parents, you must determine when and where to open these life-changing envelopes. In your short life, these may as well be the most consequential, thrilling and painful seconds you will ever experience. So, the next question one must undoubtedly ask is: with whom do I share these moments with?

As for myself, I first surveyed the few secluded spots in my house where I can curl up, open a letter and continue either to cry or scream in peace, but after further investigation, the clear answer came to me. After spending my last four years with amazingly intelligent, compassionate and competitive girls at Hockaday, I want to share these special moments with people who have gone through the same thing as myself. Laughing, suffering and growing together throughout high school, I feel as though it is only natural to share these experiences that will determine my future with the people who have helped shape my present.

You could say I am slightly biased, having spent my last 18 years doing everything with my mirror-image hovering unwaveringly beside me, but having a twin has taught me that special moments usually tend to be shared with the ones you love the most.

From school to sports to taking out the trash, we’re conjoined at the hip. So, like many students, we’ve set a plan to open our letters with each other, whether it be in the car, at home or during Y period.

If that doesn’t float your college-boat, you can follow the example of our beloved graduated senior class of 2018. Try opening them in the school parking lot, your advisor’s classroom or the bathroom on the third floor of the science building–my personal favorite.

In such an encouraging but similarly competitive academic environment, sometimes seniors forget that one is not defined by the institution that awards your college degree. A rejection doesn’t indicate that life’s doors will now close indefinitely, as an acceptance also doesn’t determine your life’s success, effort or drive.

Knowing this, and ready to face either an acceptance or a rejection with a group of compassionate people by my side, I can conquer these letters with a celebratory entourage or a consoling shoulder to cry on.

So whether you choose to celebrate with a throng of your closest comrades or just your non-judgmental cat, remember that your worth and value in this world doesn’t change after you open your college decision letter. So no matter whatever comes in the mail around Dec. 15, the world awaits your contributions.

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Emily Wu

Emily is an amateur gamer who loves fencing and digging into her avocado. Her dream is to have a jewelry box filled with a collection of her most favorite rings—including her Hockaday senior ring.

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